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Bryaceae Schwägr. Search in NYBG Virtual Herbarium Decrease font Increase font Restore font
 

Published In: Species Muscorum Frondosorum 47. 1830. (Sp. Musc. Frond.) Name publication detail
 

Project Name Data (Last Modified On 2/20/2009)
Acceptance : Accepted
Project Data     (Last Modified On 3/17/2009)
General Reference:

Notes     (Last Modified On 3/17/2009)
general taxon notes:

 

The Bryaceae consist of 16 genera worldwide (Crosby et al. 2000). Eleven genera were reported from China (Redfearn et al. 1996), and they are all treated in this flora. The species of the Bryaceae often occur in a wide range of habitats, and they are extremely variable, resulting in the difficulty of general characterization. Sporophytic characters are often important for determining the genera and species. In the field and herbarium material, it is very difficult to recognize the sterile plants into species, sometimes even to the genus. Many species remain poorly understood.
 
The Bryaceae are generally further divided into three subfamilies, and the majority of the species are in the subfamily Bryoideae. Subfamilial treatments of the family are not dealt with in this flora.

 

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Bryaceae
真藓科 zhen xian ke
by Zhang Da-cheng, Li Xing-jiang, and Si He
 
 
Plants perennial, often small to sometimes large, green, yellowish green to reddish, in tufts. Stems erect, short or elongate, simple or branched, sometimes primary stems creeping, usually radiculose at base; central strand usually present. Leaves often soft, often multi-series, rarely 3-ranked; lower leaves smaller, sparse, upper leaves larger, dense, ovate, obovate, oblong-ovate to lanceolate, rarely linear-lanceolate; margins entire or serrulate above, usually bordered by elongated cells; costae single, often strong, reaching the middle or above, or percurrent to excurrent, ending in short awns; cells unistratose, rarely bistratose or tristratose at margins; basal cells usually rectangular, distinctly larger than those cells above the bases; median cells rhomboidal, oblong-hexagonal to narrowly rhomboidal or linear. Gemmae cups terminal. Asexual gemmae sometimes present in leaf axils or mixed with rhizoids. Autoicous or dioicous. Setae slender; capsules erect, suberect to pendulous, usually symmetric or pyriform, rarely spherical; neck clearly differentiated; stomata present; annuli often persistent; opercula conic, often shortly rostrate; peristome double; exostome teeth 16, well developed; endostome segments narrowly lanceolate; basal membrane usually well developed; cilia often developed, sometimes absent; rarely exostome or endostome reduced or absent. Calyptrae cucullate, naked. Spores small, green or yellowish green, smooth or papillose.
 

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1. Exostome teeth absent.......................................................................................6. Mielichhoferia
1. Exostome teeth present.......................................................................................................2
2. Endostome segments separate from the exostome teeth, basal membrane and cilia absent........................ 7. Orthodontium
2. Endostome segments adherent to the exostome teeth, basal membrane and cilia present.....................3
3. Leaves lanceolate to narrowly lanceolate, subulate or linear; leaf cells linear-rhomboidal to linear.............. 4
3. Leaves oblong, oblong-ovate to ovate or elliptic; leaf cells hexagonal, oblong or elongate-rhomboidal....... 6
4. Leaves linear or narrowly long-subulate at apex; costae excurrent...............................5. Leptobryum
4. Leaves lanceolate or narrowly lanceolate, short at apex; costae percurrent or ending well below the apex 5
5. Exostome teeth narrow, undivided..........................................................................9. Pohlia
5. Exostome teeth broad, divided to the middle part of the teeth....................................10. Pseudopohlia
6. Stems long, slender, julaceous; leaves strongly appressed, imbricate, ovate or oblong-elliptic; capsules pyriform or elongate-pyriform, apophyses slender................................................1. Anomobryum
6. Stems various, not julaceous; leaves usually not appressed; or if julaceous, the leaves broadly cordate; capsules spherical, apophyses thick........................................................................................7
7. Capsules asymmetric, more or less gibbous, often with an oblique mouth; endostome segments longer than the exostome teeth............................................................................................. 8. Plagiobryum
7. Capsules symmetric, pyriform to elongate-pyriform, with a level mouth; endostome segments shorter than the exostome teeth............................................................................................................................8
8. Stems sparsely foliate, with leaves obliquely appressed in 2–3 ranks.................................. 4. Epipterygium
8. Stems densely foliate, with leaves closely appressed in more than 3 ranks.........................................9
9. Capsules erect to inclined.................................................................................2. Brachymenium
9. Capsules horizontal to pendulous............................................................................................10
10. Primary and secondary stems not differentiated, erect, often densely branched; leaves not distinctly dimorphic; setae usually single....................................................................................3. Bryum
10. Primary stems creeping, secondary stems erect; lower leaves small, scale-like, sparse, upper leaves larger, forming rosettes; setae usually clustered................................................................ 11. Rhodobryum
 
 
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